Australian study on Early Intervention

There was an incredible study in Australia published yesterday that says with early intervention, deaf children can develop better speech and vocabulary than their hearing peers.  Here is the link:

http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/news/nsw/australia-leads-the-world-in-teaching-deaf-children-to-hear-and-speak/story-fni0cx12-1227243849653

“Based on data from 696 Australian and New Zealand children, the study found that 83 per cent of deaf preschool children had better or average vocabulary skills compared with typical hearing children. Almost 78 per cent had better or average language skills and 73 per cent had speech in the normal range or better.”

We are so thankful for the newborn hearing screenings so that we could start therapy right away and get Fiona the implants as soon as we could.   And now Fiona can hear us talk to her ALL DAY LONG!!! 🙂

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8 thoughts on “Australian study on Early Intervention

  1. Kelly Mackey

    You know I am a HUGE advocate of early intervention! Neuroplasticity is age dependent, so it is always so sad when children don’t receive intervention until they are several years old. I can see a huge difference between children who receive support early on and those who do not receive any services until they enter Kindergarten. I was just reading the other day for my motor control & learning class, and the author discussed why cochlear implants should be implanted by/ at the 6 month mark. (Of course, he didn’t mention anything about fighting with insurance companies!) You and Mark have been on the ball since day 1!!! Fiona is in great hands, and I can’t wait to see her excel as she grows!!!

    1. Eliza Isham Post author

      Thanks Kelly! There are some countries outside of the U.S. that implant at 6 months old. Coincidentally Australia and New Zealand are two of them.

  2. Amanda Lancaster

    This is all such fascinating stuff! I can already tell she has a lot to say. She is going to be talking your ear off for sure!

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